• Centauri High School

    Course Descriptions

     

    Language Department                                                                                                                                                                                 

     

    English I A and B (Freshmen):1 year                                       

    The freshman English survey class will study a variety of short stories, poetry and novels, as well as some non-fiction. Writing will be literature-based and vocabulary will be contextual. Grammar will be studied with a hands-on approach, and further instruction will be provided in areas that need improvement. Many assessments will be project-based, and there will be some team learning. Students will learn to analyze literature and discuss it in class as well as in writing.

     

    Accelerated English I A and B (Freshmen): 1 year

    This course is aligned to the Colorado State Standards. Students will continue developing skills in reading, writing, listening, speaking, and critical thinking. Students will read fiction, as well as non-fiction, in a variety of genres. Students will write an assortment of pieces including literary analysis vignettes, and arguments. The course work is rigorous and in-depth. All written work will be presented in MLA format. Students should expect course work to be completed in and outside of the classroom.

     

    English II A and B (Sophomore year): 1 year

    Prerequisite: English I or Accelerated English I

    This course is aligned to the Colorado State Standards. This course covers vocabulary enrichment, short story/novel research with a focus on multi-cultural studies, writing, creativity, and expository writing.

    Students will read fiction, and non-fiction, in a variety of genres. Students will write and assortment of pieces including literary analysis vignettes, and argument. All written work will be presented in MLA format. Students should expect to complete course work   in and outside of the classroom.

     

    Accelerated English II A and B (Sophomore year):1 year

    Prerequisite: English I or Accelerated English I

    This course is aligned to the Colorado State Standards. This course covers vocabulary enrichment, short story/novel research with a focus on multi-cultural studies, writing, creativity, and expository writing.

    This class is for students who have shown proficiency in reading, writing, speaking, viewing, and critical thinking. Students will read fiction, and non-fiction, in a variety of genres. Students will write an assortment of pieces including literary analysis vignettes, and arguments. The course work is rigorous and in depth. All written work will be presented in MLA format. Students should expect to complete course work   in and outside of the classroom.

     

    English III A and B (Junior year): 1 year

    Prerequisite: English I or Accelerated English I and English II or Accelerated English II

    English III includes the study of American literature, poetry, short stories and novels. Students will analyze literature in reading and writing assignments. Research writing and vocabulary development will also be featured.

     

    Accelerated English III A and B (Junior year): 1 year

    Prerequisite: English I or Accelerated English I and English II or Accelerated English II

    Accelerated English III is a college preparatory course which continues to build upon the skills developed in previous language arts courses in order to make an in depth study of American literature and its significance in the modern world. This course will be directed toward recognition of American writing as a record of the diverse development of the country politically and economically. In addition to gaining critical reading skills, analytic and research writing skills will also be developed.  Students will read, write, and react to materials at the college level in such fields as research and reasoning, journalism, oral communication, critical analysis of texts and other media. More so, students will examine rhetoric as a primary means of persuasion, fallacies and rhetorical failures, and other tasks that demand college level reasoning. Students will complete a variety of tasks and projects, and will be given multiple opportunities to prepare for the SAT exam.

     

    English IV: Capstone (Senior Year): 1 year

    English IV, Capstone will consist of a capstone project that will demonstrate the culmination of skills and knowledge gained through their academic career by completing a long-term, multi-faceted project.  This class will be taken if a student is not a completer in any of the CTE pathways, has not met state requirements for the SAT and also needs to complete their fourth year of English that is required for graduation. 



    English 099 (Senior year)

    Prerequisites:  English I/ Acc. English I, English II/ Acc. English II, English III/ Acc. English III

    English 099 emphasizes critical thinking as students explore reading and writing for different academic disciplines. The course is designed to enable students who do not score high enough to place in ENG 102  to build skills required for college-level reading and writing.  They will develop writing skills which include sentence, paragraph, and essay structures. Students also focus on writing as a process of invention, exploration, organization, and development of ideas.  Students who complete English 099 will take English 102 second semester.

     

    One of the following is a prerequisite for English 102 and Communications 202:

     

    • ACT English score 18 or higher
    • SAT Verbal/ Reading score 470 or higher
    • Accuplacer Sentence Skills score 94 or higher

     

    English 102  (Senior year) 1st semester or 2nd semester

    English I/Acc. English I through English III/ Acc. English III

     

    Concurrent Enrollment Class

    The primary goal of English Composition I is to introduce students to the rhetorical techniques that provide the basis for academic writing. In this course, students will improve their ability to read and analyze arguments from a variety of genres and will understand the four-way relationship among critical thinking, reading, writing, and audience.

    In this course, students will be expected to participate in an active learning environment. Students will gain the skills necessary to communicate with clarity, coherence, and persuasiveness, and to demonstrate critical analysis, logic, precision, and rhetorical awareness in the English language. Students will learn to identify, analyze, and create meaningful arguments of their own and formulate and apply ideas to new contexts. Students who pass this class with a grade of “C” or higher will receive three college credits through Western State Colorado University paid for by CHS.  If the grade is a “D” or lower, student is responsible for payment.

     

    Communications COM 202  (Seniors) 2nd semester

    Prerequisite:  English Composition I

    Concurrent Enrollment Class

    The primary goal of English Composition II is to use academic research and effective argumentation as means to further develop their communication skills, civic discourse, and rhetorical strategies students were exposed to in English Composition I. In this course, students will continue to read and analyze arguments from a variety of genres and will learn the necessary components of effective academic research.  Most importantly, students will research, develop, and experiment with original and effective arguments of their own. In this course, students will be expected to participate in an active learning environment. Students will gain the skills necessary to communicate with clarity, coherence, and persuasiveness, and to demonstrate critical analysis, logic, precision, and rhetorical awareness of the English language. In addition, students will be expected to engage in the process of critical thinking.  Students will learn to identify, analyze, and evaluate arguments and secondary research in order to arrive at reasoned and meaningful arguments and positions of their own as they formulate and apply their informed ideas to new contexts. Students who pass the class with a grade of “C” or higher will receive three college credits through Western Colorado University.

     

    Foreign Language Department

     

    Spanish I- A and B: 1 year

    This introductory class will focus on the five areas in learning a foreign language: speaking, understanding, reading, writing and culture. We will emphasize being able to speak and be spoken to in a number of typical situations by having an oral interview every week. We will also use a video series called “Destinos” which provides authentic Spanish spoken by natives in cultural settings in Spain, Argentina, Puerto Rico and Mexico.

     

    Spanish II- A and B: 1 year

    Prerequisite: Spanish I or native fluency

    The Spanish II class continues the communicative approach begun in Spanish I by adding the past tense and command forms. Vocabulary is enriched and expanded.

     

    Math Department

     

    Integrated Math I A and B (Freshmen): 1 year

    Integrated Math courses emphasize the teaching of mathematics as problem solving, communication, reasoning and emphasize the connections among mathematical topics and between mathematics and other disciplines. The multi-period sequence of Integrated Math replaces the traditional Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II sequence of courses, and usually follows the following topics during a three or four-year sequence; algebra, functions, geometry from both a synthetic and an algebraic perspective, trigonometry, statistics and probability, discrete mathematics, the conceptual underpinnings of calculus, and mathematical structure.

     

    Accelerated Integrated Math I A and B (Freshmen): 1 year

    Integrated Math courses emphasize the teaching of mathematics as problem solving, communication, reasoning, and emphasize the connections among mathematical topics and between mathematics and other disciplines. The multi-period sequence of Integrated Math replaces the traditional Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II sequence of courses, and usually follows the following topics during a three or four-year sequence; algebra, functions, geometry from both a synthetic and an algebraic perspective, trigonometry, statistics and probability, discrete mathematics, the conceptual underpinnings of calculus, and mathematical structure.

     

    Integrated Math II A and B (Sophomore year): 1 year

    Prerequisite:  Integrated Math I or Acc. Integrated Math I

    Integrated Math courses emphasize the teaching of mathematics as problem solving, communication, reasoning, and emphasize the connections among mathematical topics and between mathematics and other disciplines. The multi-period sequence of Integrated Math replaces the traditional Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II sequence of courses, and usually follows the following topics during a three or four-year sequence; algebra, functions, geometry from both a synthetic and an algebraic perspective, trigonometry, statistics and probability, discrete mathematics, the conceptual underpinnings of calculus, and mathematical structure.

     

    Accelerated Integrated Math II A and B (Sophomore year): 1 year

    Prerequisite:  Accelerated Math I

    Integrated Math courses emphasize the teaching of mathematics as problem solving, communication, reasoning, and emphasize the connections among mathematical topics and between mathematics and other disciplines. The multi-period sequence of Integrated Math replaces the traditional Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II sequence of courses, and usually follows the following topics during a three or four-year sequence; algebra, functions, geometry from both a synthetic and an algebraic perspective, trigonometry, statistics and probability, discrete mathematics, the conceptual underpinnings of calculus, and mathematical structure.

     

    Integrated Math III A and B (Junior year): 1 year

    Prerequisite:  Integrated Math I and Integrated Math II

    Integrated Math courses emphasize the teaching of mathematics as problem solving, communication, reasoning, and emphasize the connections among mathematical topics and between mathematics and other disciplines. The multi-period sequence of Integrated Math replaces the traditional Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II sequence of courses, and usually follows the following topics during a three or four-year sequence; algebra, functions, geometry from both a synthetic and an algebraic perspective, trigonometry, statistics and probability, discrete mathematics, the conceptual underpinnings of calculus, and mathematical structure.

     

    Integrated Math IV - Senior Capstone (Senior Year): 1 year

    Math IV Capstone will consist of a capstone project that will demonstrate the culmination of skills and knowledge gained through their academic career by completing a long-term, multi-faceted project.  This class will be taken if a student is not a completer in any of the CTE pathways, has not met state requirements on the SAT score and also needs to complete their math requirements for graduation.

     

    Precalculus A: 1st semester

    Prerequisite:  Acc. Integrated Math I and Acc. Integrated Math II

    The following areas will be covered: detailed study of polynomials and rational functions, investigating exponential and logarithmic functions, applications of systems of equations and inequalities, and sequences and series.

    Precalculus B: 2nd semester

    Prerequisite:  Acc. Integrated Math I, Acc. Integrated Math II, and Precalculus A

    Introduction to angles, trigonometric functions, and exploration of the fundamental identities will be covered.

     

    AP Calculus A&B: 1 year

    Prerequisite:  Precalculus A & B

    This course is designed to study the calculus of functions on one independent variable. This course intends to prepare students for the College Board Advanced Placement Calculus AB exam.   AP classes prepare students to succeed in college by providing rigorous, demanding coursework.  Students who receive a 3 or higher on an AP exam are 72% more likely to graduate from college and may receive college credit.  Taking AP classes may increase your chances of receiving scholarships and getting into college.



    Science Department

     

    Physical Science A: 1st semester

    Students will learn about the various laws of physics and chemistry and how these laws interact in the physical world around us, as well as the universe in which we live. Students will gain a sound understanding of the basics of scientific study.

     

    Physical Science B: 2nd semester

    This course will be a continuation of Physical Science A. Students will be using hands-on activities to help them employ scientific thinking. They will put various theories through tests to understand how the laws of physics and chemistry are constantly at play in our environment.

     

    Honors Physical Science A & B (single weighted course): (teacher recommendation)

    Honors physical science is an advanced first year course for high school freshmen. This course focuses on physics and chemistry. Students will learn the basic concepts of Newton's laws, energy, light, structure of matter, chemical equations, etc.

     

    General Biology A&B: 1 year

    This class takes students from the inner workings of the cell to the most complex living being - the human. Topics covered include photosynthesis, genetics, classification, evolution, the six kingdoms, reproduction in plants and animals, and the systems of the human body.

     

    Environmental Science: 1 year (teacher recommendation) 

    Prerequisite: Junior/ Senior students who have passed General Biology

    Environmental science is a course dedicated to understanding the interactions between earth’s natural systems and the   demands placed on them by the human population. This course examines the scientific principles behind natural phenomena and resource cycles, explores how we utilize these systems and our impact, and potential solutions for the resulting consequences of resource mismanagement and exploitation. The course includes elements of life science, physical science, and social science and focuses on breadth and interrelatedness of relevant current events. Concepts can be explored through inquiry based laboratory exercises, environmental health assessment techniques, student presentations and projects.

    AP Environmental Science- year long course, can be for concurrent credit (double weighted course)  Year long course 

    Open To: Juniors and seniors who have successfully completed Biology and Chemistry (teacher recommendation required).

    Themes examined in AP Environmental Science include but are not limited to: 

    • Science as a process. 
    • Energy conversions underlie all ecological processes. 
    • The Earth itself is one interconnected system. 
    • Humans alter natural systems. 
    • Environmental problems have a cultural and social context. 
    • Human survival depends on developing practices that will achieve sustainable systems. 

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                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         Chemistry A:   An introduction to the fundamental concepts of general chemistry. Focus areas include scientific measurement and analysis, atomic structure, chemical nomenclature, balancing equations, and laboratory experiments. Sophomores must have teacher approval.

     

    Chemistry BAn introduction to the fundamental concepts of general chemistry. Focus areas include gas laws, stoichiometry, acids & bases, oxidation/reduction, and organic chemistry. This course also includes laboratory experiments. Prerequisite: C or better in Chemistry I or teacher approval.

    Honors Chemistry I & II (Pre-AP Chemistry)  : (single-weighted course) teacher recommendation required. The goal of Pre-AP Chemistry is to provide students with a foundation to understand the structure and properties of chemical substances and to make predictions in regards to the movement of energy in a system. This course is designed to give you the background and skills to prepare you for more advanced science classes, such as AP Chemistry.

    AP Chemistry (double weighted course): 1 year- concurrent enrollment class if application is complete.

    Prerequisite:  Biology and Chemistry

    This course is the equivalent of an introductory or first-year college level chemistry course.  Students are expected to have a strong background in mathematics since AP Chemistry involves numerical problem solving and word problem analysis.  Course content includes gases, liquids and solids, thermochemistry, bonding, solutions, rate of reactions, equilibrium, acid base chemistry, electrochemistry, nuclear reactions and organic chemistry.    AP classes prepare students to succeed in college by providing rigorous, demanding coursework.  Students who receive a 3 or higher on an AP exam are 72% more likely to graduate from college and may receive college credit.  Taking AP classes may increase your chances of receiving scholarships and getting into college.

     

    Human Anatomy and Physiology A&B (single weighted course): 1 year- concurrent enrollment class if application is complete.

    Prerequisite: Biology  

    This course will cover the basics of human anatomy and physiology of the body with an emphasis on how the body works and why. This course is strongly recommended for college bound students and those pursuing careers in nursing, medicine, health services, sports medicine, and physical therapy.

     

    Social Science Department



    World History A: 1st semester

    Students will learn that the 19th Century was the dawn of the Industrial Revolution. They will also learn the value of raw materials, the importance of technology in triggering this revolution, workers and the hardship placed on these workers, and the hardship placed on workers as they made the transition from the farm to city and factory life. The birth of unions will be discussed.

     

    World History B: 2nd semester

    Students will complete an in-depth study of the 1900’s.  Knowledge of World War I and its aftermath will be gained. The causes and effects of this war not only abroad, but at home, and will be investigated. Students will learn about the role of the United States during this time period.  A working knowledge of the cost of this conflict and the outcome will be investigated. The stipulations placed on the winners and losers will be studied as well as the roles of men like  Lenin, Stalin, and Mussolini.

     

    U.S. History A:  1st semester

    Students will develop an in-depth knowledge of World War I and World War II. Students will learn why these conflicts began. Each student will learn of the great leaders of this time period and their contributions. The political issues will be studied with a working knowledge of the outcome that has developed from these issues. Students will gain an in-depth appreciation for what people in the United States and Europe went through during these treacherous times.

     

    U.S. History B: 2nd semester

    Students will survey the modern nations and their great leaders after the devastating world wars. An appreciation and understanding will develop as students learn of the transition each nation had to go through.  Knowledge of the Korean War and the Vietnam Conflict will be established.  An understanding of why the United States became involved will be discussed. Great leaders such as JFK, Martin Luther King, and Reies Tijerina will be studied along with equal rights and the role of women in American society.

     

    Government A and B:  1 year

    Students will learn about the foundation of the American Government and its origins. They will study the development of the American Constitution and what it offers to each American citizen.  An in-depth look will be directed to the political parties (Republican-Democratic-Independent). Students will study the right of Americans to vote and voters’ behaviors.

     

    Art

    Community Art: 1 semester

    This class is designed with the intention to promote the arts by creating aesthetically interesting art compositions, which will extend student’s talents into the community and throughout the district. Student projects will consist of the use of different mediums to create works of art such as tiles, murals, mosaics, decorations, etc. Projects may be created for businesses, churches, schools, exterior walls, and community centers. No prior art experience is necessary for this class.

    Mixed Media: 1 semester

    This is a fundamental course on basic art techniques. In this class, students will experience a variety of drawing techniques, art media, and learn about color theory and critiquing. The class provides a foundation of basic concepts, materials, and processes of the visual arts as well as a brief history of art. Course may not be repeated.  No independent art students.

    Ceramics: 1 semester

    In this class, students will learn about the basic techniques of ceramics, materials, hand -building, slips, glazing firing, beginning throwing, utilitarian, and non-utilitarian ceramic forms. This course may be repeated for individual research in ceramic forms related to development of aesthetic and expressive qualities of clay.

    Painting:  1 semester

    This course is the study of color theory along with painting problems with emphasis on personal development of techniques and abilities with oil, watercolor, acrylic, and mixed media. This course may be repeated for individual research and development in the painting media. This is a painting class only.

    Drawing: 1 semester

    This course is suited for beginners. It focuses on building fundamental drawing skills. Students will learn about the Elements of Art and Principles of Design, and how to apply these to drawing. Additionally, students will learn basic techniques such as shading, controlling tones, compositions, and drawing methods.

    Drawing II:  1 semester

    This course allows students to work with a variety of mediums – taking drawing to the next level.  Students will work with pastels, watercolor on scratch boards, and colored pencils.  Students are encouraged to complete Drawing I prior to this class.

     

    Music

    BandOpportunities include performing at concerts, honor bands, solo and ensemble, pep band, jazz band and concert band.

    Technology in MusicThis class will allow students to explore the world of creating digital music and use it in different projects (e.g. music for documentaries, commercial music, creation of special effects, music for video games, and creation of electronic music and manipulation of sound). During this project based learning experience students will also learn and apply musical concepts taught in a traditional setting like harmony, time signatures, dynamics, and expression, among others.

    Students will acquire the foundations for creating computer based music using varied software technologies that will introduce and enhance their understanding of basic digital recording techniques. Students will also gain an understanding of and appreciation for the history and development of recording technology and sound recording.

     

    PHYSICAL EDUCATION

    Athletic Development  

    This class is designed for athletes with the focus on weight training.  The student must be self-motivated to take this class.  Students are required to dress out and work out every day.  Students will also need to have a physical on record in the office in order to take this class.

     

    Physical Education

    This class is designed for any student.  Students will work on physical fitness, flexibility, weight training, and individual and team activities. Students  participate in individual and team activities.  Daily participation and dressing out is required.

     

    Special Education

     

    Transition

    This course is taught as a separate class and is infused to blend with the core curriculum.  It provides an atmosphere for students to increase their self-esteem and social relationships and build problem-solving and decision-making skills that will add self-confidence and a sense of responsibility.  This curriculum provides a foundation for students to make realistic decisions about careers.

     

    Basic Math:  9th-12th grades 

    This course is designed to be an individualized program that allows each student to work at his/her own pace.  Workplace skills are also emphasized.  Students will review basic computations with carefully sequenced instruction and strategies that extend understanding.

     

    Language:  9th-12th grades 

    This course emphasizes reading comprehension and fluency, mechanics of spelling, written expression and the advancement of writing skills.  Reading fluency and vocabulary building are also a part of this course.



    Career and Technical Education

     

    Business Education

     

    Introduction to Business: Year long class

     

    Intro to PC Applications/Computer Applications:  Semester long class

    Concurrent Enrollment Class (only if student completes application)

    Students will create documents using a word processor that includes basic desktop publishing skills and completion of a job skills unit.  This class may be taken for high school and college credit through Trinidad State Junior College.

     

    Accounting Principles I semester long class- Prerequisites- Personal Finance or Workplace Basics, or instructor approved

     

    Accounting Principles II- semester long class - Prerequisites- Personal Finance or Workplace Basics, or instructor approved.  Must have passed Accounting I.

     

    Principles of Marketing -semester long class - Prerequisites - Personal Finance or Workplace Basics, or instructor approved

     

    Principles of Management -semester long class - Prerequisites - Must have taken personal finance, workplace basics, or instructor approved.



    Adobe Indesign (Yearbook)- Semester long class- can be concurrent enrollment with application.

    In this course, students will gain skills in one or more of the following areas: page design, advanced publishing techniques, copywriting, editing and photography while producing a creative, innovative yearbook which records school memories and events.

     

    Personal Financial Literacy: Semester long class- can be concurrent enrollment with application.

    Personal financial literacy will provide students with the opportunity to learn and apply valuable life skills in money management, career planning, saving and investing, credit management and retirement planning.  Students will explore successful strategies to grow and protect wealth and discover the information and resources available to manage their lives financially.




    Agriculture

    Intro to Agriculture:

    These courses are the beginning of a four-year program for students interested in enrolling in an agriculture-related field in college and/or as a career and is an introductory course for students who are interested in animal and plant science.  Students will study plant/animal cells, animal breeds, anatomy, and animal health.  Students must join FFA to be enrolled in these classes.



    Principles of Animal Science and Veterinary Science: Prerequisite- One year of Intro to Agriculture

    Students will explore in more depth the plant and animal science world.  Students will continue learning about animal nutrition, reproduction, crop science and physiology.  Farm management is included.  FFA studies require students to participate in at least one judged event.  Students must join FFA to be enrolled in this class.



    Principles of Horticulture and Greenhouse Productions - Prerequisite - One year of Intro to Agriculture - Prerequisites of Intro to Ag and Principles of Animal Science and Veterinary Science.

     

    Welding

    Intro to Welding A & B:  1 year

    This introductory course exposes students to the oxyacetylene welding process.  Students will learn about the proper use of the cutting torch and the welding process, basic shop safety, and the safe use of shop tools.  Students will learn how to weld all joints in the flat position and will experience arc welding processes at the end of the course.

     

    Welding Technology I A & B:  1 year

    Prerequisite:  Welding I

    This course consists of an A and B section, and students will need to take both sections and pass these sections in order to complete the course.  The student will learn how to weld in five positions and will make all joint welds in these positions.  This will consist of welding with the SMAW process (stick welding).  Students will learn how to make and read a blueprint of the project/s they will be assigned.  Shop safety and use of all saws will be demonstrated.

     

    Welding Technology II A & B: 1 year

    Prerequisite:  Welding II

    Students will work on the SMAW process (stick welding) and be introduced to the GMAC or MIG process.  Students will also be introduced to the plasma arc cutting process and will use these two processes in the construction of joints and position welding.  Each student will build projects from a drawing that is assigned or approved by the instructor.  This course consists of A and B sections.  Both sections must be completed for the student to receive credit in this course.

     

    Welding III A & B : 1 year

    Prerequisite: All prior welding courses completed with a grade of “C” or higher 

    The GTAW will be covered in this course.  Each student will continue to work on all processes in this course and will work on projects of their choice and assigned projects.  Students must demonstrate proficiency of all welding processes, must be able to make and read a blueprint, and demonstrate efficient shop safety.

     

    Welding IV A & B - Tailored to Individual need

     

    Automotive

     

    Automotive Technology I  1 year

    Students will study automotive shop safety, automotive tool safety, power tool safety, and proper use of automotive manuals.  An overview of the seven automotive systems, basic engine operation, basic principles of the diesel engine, automotive careers and opportunities, and becoming an automotive professional will be discussed.  Students will be required to become involved in hands-on experiences in the lab.

     

    Automotive Technology II: 1 year

    Prerequisite:  Automotive Technology I

    Students will practice and review shop safety principles and will study, in more detail, the seven automotive systems:  engines, brake systems, suspension and steering systems, transmission and transaxle drivetrains, electrical and electronic systems, and heating and air conditioning.  Students will also learn the basic principles of vehicle service and maintenance and will begin to learn basic engine operation (gas and diesel).  Students will be assigned projects.

     

    Automotive Technology III (Maintenance Repair): 1 year

    Prerequisite:  Automotive Technology I

    Students will review and practice shop safety principles.  This course will prepare students for engine service and repair.  Students will work hands-on with engine operation in the lab.  They will learn engine construction, the four stages of engine operation, two-stroke engines (diesel engines) and four-stroke engines, and how engines are rated.  Students will be expected to perform service and maintenance on vehicles in the lab, including proper use of technical tools and diagnostic instruments.  Students will be required to bring in projects for work in the lab.

     

    Automotive Technology IV-Diesel Technology and Electrical Systems

    Prerequisite:  Automotive Technology I

    Students will review and practice shop safety principles.  Students will be expected to know the use of automotive power tools, hand tools and diagnostic instruments.  Students will be expected to diagnose the problem and make necessary repairs and know how to order parts using proper documentation.  Students will be expected to bring in projects for work in the lab.

     

    Automotive/Diesel Technology:  Prerequisites 

    The automotive/diesel technology course is set by priority number and class level:

    Automotive/Diesel I  (P-1)  Beginners new to the field and/or no automotive experience

    Automotive/Diesel II  (P-2)  Students who have some experience and at least 50% program completion

    Automotive/Diesel III  (P-3)  Advanced students who have 75% program completion and are prepared for an entry level position in the automotive/diesel industry.

    Building Trades

     

    Building Trades I: 1 year

    This course will cover safety, hand tools, portable power tools, stationary power equipment, planning and design of working drawings, reading prints, and completion of a personal or assigned project.  Students must pass this course to continue in the Building Trades program.

     

    Building Trades II: 1 year

    Prerequisite:  Building Trades I

    This course consists of instruction on layout:  floor framing, wall framing, roof framing, roof coverings, floor coverings, ventilation, classes of lumber and other types of construction materials, and a personal or assigned project.  Students must pass the course to continue to Building Trades III.

     

    Building Trades III: 1 year

    Prerequisite:  Building Trades I and II

    This course includes instruction on windows, skylights, exterior doors and frames, and exterior walls, siding and brick veneer, plaster and drywall, interior trim, interior doors, wood paneling, wood and vinyl flooring, carpet, ceramic tile, insulation, interior and exterior painting, energy efficiency, and a personal or assigned project.  Students must pass this course to continue to Building Trades IV.

     

    Building Trades IV: 1 year

    Prerequisite:  Building Trades IV

    This course covers cabinets and built-in cabinets, chimney fireplaces, stairs, remodeling and renovation, manufactured housing, and a personal or assigned project.



    Health Science/Med Prep

     

    Introduction to Health Sciences and Occupations A/B

     

    This two-semester introductory Health Science course provides an overview of the challenging environments and occupation is the healthcare field. This course introduces students to the five pathways that make up the health science cluster (Diagnostic, Therapeutic, and Support Services, Health Informatics, Biotechnology Research and Development). In addition, students are provided a hands-on application of the foundational skills/ knowledge including health maintenance, employability skills, teamwork, healthcare systems, communications, and legal issues in healthcare. This course includes preparation for Basic Life Support for Healthcare Providers certification.  

     

    Medical Terminology A/B:  Year long class

     

    Medical Terminology is a two-semester course that helps students understand the Greek and Latin based language of medicine and healthcare. Emphasis is placed upon word roots, suffixes, prefixes, abbreviations, symbols, and anatomical terms, and terms associated with movements of the human body. The course also stresses the proper pronunciation, spelling, and usage of medical terminology  

     

    Emergency Medical Responder - Year long class

    The Emergency Medical Responder course is an entry-level emergency medical provider course that prepares individuals for employment or a volunteer position in a variety of pre-hospital, industrial and first responder settings.  The successful completion of an approved EMR course can be a prerequisite to pursuing training as a CNA nurse, fire fighter, and many law enforcement programs.  The EMR course is designed to provide participants with the basic knowledge and skills to manage many medical and trauma-related emergencies.  Upon successful completion of this course, students are eligible to seek national certification as an Emergency Medical Responder through the National Registry of EMT’s.

      

    Medical Forensics-  one semester only (Prerequisite- must take EMR before Medical Forensics)

     

    This semester long course is designed to create an awareness of the branch of health science relating to medical forensics. This course focuses on introductory skills and assessment in order to develop the ability to identify, analyze, and process logically using deductive reasoning and problem solving. Medical forensics involves many aspects of health science instruction including laboratory skills and safety, microscopy, toxicology, measurement,

    physical evidence identification, pathology, anthropology, entomology, psychology, blood spatter analysis, and career exploration.

     

    Intro to Medical Assisting I (must take Intro to Health as a prerequisite)

     

    This is the first semester of a one year program. Students will develop knowledge and skills that combine the medical and clerical fields. Students will learn skills such as patient exam preparation, assessment of vital signs, routine lab procedures, medical transcription, financial accounting, patient and insurance company billing, and record-keeping  

     

    Intro to Medical Assisting II

     

    This is the second semester of a one year program. Students will continue to develop knowledge and practice skills that combine the medical and clerical fields. Students will learn skills such as patient exam preparation, assessment of vital signs, routine lab procedures, medical transcription, financial accounting, patient and insurance company billing, and record-keeping. Students will learn Medical Terminology, knowledge of blood borne pathogens/OSHA regulations, medical asepsis, procedural glving, pateing gowning, positions measurement of vital signs and rooming of patients  

    .



    Family and Consumer Sciences

    Level One

    Teen Choices: 1 semester

    In this course, you will learn how to make healthy decisions throughout your teen years.  You will learn skills and practices required by individuals to develop, manage and strengthen:  social, psychological, and physical wellness, interpersonal relationships, safe sexual decision making, anti-substance use practices, and understanding teens and the law.  

    Culinary Nutrition: 1 semester

     The purpose of this course is to develop lifelong, healthy individuals with an understanding of healthy and nutritious preparation techniques utilizing various resources and skills. Emphasis is  placed on implementing healthy nutritional choices, preparing nutrient-dense seasonal foods, sports nutrition, exploring careers related to culinary nutrition, and practicing wise consumer.

    Catering 1 & 2 Year long class

    Level Two :(Pre-requisites: Teen Choices and Culinary Nutrition)

     

    This two semester program is designed for students with career interests in the food industry as well as owning their own catering business.  The purpose of this course is to develop skills in quantity food preparation, safety and sanitation, planning, customer service, business plans and entrepreneurship.

     

    FCS Leadership A & B Year long class

    Level Three: (Pre-requisites: Catering 1 & 2 or approval of Mrs. Bechaver)

     

    Are you an advanced family and consumer sciences student wanting to cultivate essential leadership skills and establish fundamental knowledge of Family Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA). Students will have the opportunity to develop and enhance a personal philosophy of leadership that includes: the understanding of self, others and community, and acceptance of responsibilities inherent in community membership. Learning opportunities may include direct experiences such as: FCCLA competition preparation, community service projects, dynamic leadership portfolios, and career exploration. Two semester program. 

     

    FCS Capstone Project Year long class

    Level Four: (Completed three levels of FCS classes or approval of Mrs. Bechaver) 

     

    This course allows for advanced work in any Family and Consumer Sciences Program of Study. This advanced work can be individualized to the specific program of study to allow for specialized study for the student. It may include project based learning or preparation for the end of program industry certification. Specific content and course design will be determined by the instructor in collaboration with the individual student









    Miscellaneous Courses

     

    Senior Seminar

    Seniors only

    This class provides seniors with the guidance and instruction needed in preparation for their post- secondary endeavors.  The focus is on postsecondary education and students will explore, plan and prepare for life after high school.

     

    Ed Intern

    Juniors and Seniors only

    Education internships are offered at La Jara Elementary, Manassa Elementary, Centauri Middle School and Little Treasures for high school seniors.  Ed interns will assist preschool, elementary, and middle school teachers by tutoring students in all subject areas with special emphasis on reading and math.  

     

    Teacher Aide

    Juniors and Seniors only

    Teacher approval is required.

    Duties will vary depending on the teacher.

     

    Office Aide

    Juniors and Seniors only

    Office secretary approval is required.

    Aides will work closely with the main office secretary and be expected to assist other office staff with duties as assigned.  Attendance is a must.

     

    Ed Media

    Seniors only

    Librarian approval is required.

    Students are aides in the library and will complete tasks as assigned.

     

    Computer Tech

    Juniors and Seniors only

    Teacher approval is required

    A minimum 2.5 grade point average is required.  Students will complete tasks as assigned.

     

    DramaA performance based class on Theatre, with the semester leading to the performance of a play. This class includes acting and/or all elements of stage crew (setting up of stage, lighting, sound, etc.).

     

    Concurrent Classes offered on CHS Campus

    (subject to change based on available instructors)

     

    Psychology

    Juniors and Seniors only

    This course provides an overview of the scientific study of human behavior. Topics include history, methodology, biopsychology, sensation, perception, learning, motivation, cognition, abnormal behavior, personality theory, social psychology, and other relevant topics.

     

    Sociology

    Juniors and Seniors only

    This course introduces the scientific study of human society, culture, and social interactions. Topics include socialization, research methods, diversity and inequality, cooperation and conflict, social change, social institutions, and organizations.

     

    Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA)

    Juniors and Seniors only- must have completed prerequisites of Introduction to Health and EMR or Med-term.

    This program is designed to introduce the student to the basic concepts of nursing. It emphasizes the development of basic skills in administering safe, competent care to patients. It demonstrates skills needed for the observation and documentation of the patient's health, physical condition, and general well being. Skills will be practiced in labs and in a real-work setting. Once finished with the course, the student is eligible for certification by the State board of Nursing and employment as a certified nursing assistant.

     

    Development of Civilization 110

    Juniors and Seniors only

    A study of Western and Eastern civilizations from their Neolithic origins to 1500, with emphasis on cultural and institutional developments.

     

    Development of Civilization 111

    Juniors and Seniors only

    A study of Western and Eastern civilizations from 1500 to the present, with emphasis on cultural and institutional developments.

     

    Students have the opportunity to take six credit hours per semester of college credit.  Students must pass the prerequisite courses at CHS before enrolling in concurrent classes.  In order to take a concurrent class one (1) of the following must be met:

    1. SAT- Students should pass SAT or PSAT in order to enroll.  Juniors must meet the PSAT benchmark according to the state.  Seniors must meet SAT state requirements of 470 for Math and 500 for English.
    2. On track to graduate and passing all classes the semester before enrolling in concurrent classes.

    NON-DISCRIMINATION

    The North Conejos School District is an equal opportunity educational institution and will not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, and handicap in its activities, programs, or employment practices as required by Title VI, Title IX, ADA, and Section 504.

    For information regarding civil rights or grievance procedures, please contact:

    Title IX Coordinator/ Compliance Office     Office of Civil Rights

    Superintendent of Schools                       U.S. Department of Education         North Conejos Schools                                1961 Stout StreetCurt Wilson                                               Denver, CO 80294                                                          Cwilson@northconejos,com                     (303) 844-2991

    (719) 274-5174

    Address- 17890 S Hwy 285

    La Jara, CO 81140                                                                                                File:  GCCAA-E